When should you leave an unethical culture?

Sometimes individuals become aware of unethical behaviour that conflicts with her personal values, professional code of ethics and/or the law. Many people struggle with what they should do and generally would fall into three broad categories: a) those who choose to go into self-preservation mode and therefore remain silent and keep their heads down, b) those who choose to report unethical behaviour and c) those who choose to exit because they do not want to be associated with the organisation (another form of self-preservation). Those in the second category may eventually be forced out, especially when the people they have exposed are powerful. They may find themselves being victimised or that the leadership does not take adequate action with regard to what they have reported.

Balance strength with flexibility

I have noticed an increase in conversations around agility across various professions. This is a natural consequence of the increase in volatility, turbulence, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity in the environments organisations are forced to operate in. The upheaval caused by the pandemic has shown us all just how important agility is. Most organisations have found that they needed to adapt faster than they had ever imagined possible and some hard lessons were learnt in the process.
I have however begun to wonder whether we are not going to fall prey to overemphasising one organisational competence at the expense of other important components.