Lessons from a reformed fraudster – Finding healing and self-forgiveness

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Doctor Claudelle von Eck in an interview with Brad Sadler. Brad was convicted of fraud and had undergone a transformation process to where he is now – avidly spreading the word that fraud only brings negative dividends to the fraudster. In this first of two interviews, Dr Claudelle and Brad Sadler discuss whether fraudsters can be reformed and what one needs to do to reform yourself when you have wronged society. Brad has an honest conversation about the pain he caused and how he dealt with it. He provides crucial advice to those who have taken a wrong turn in life and guides them on how to find self-forgiveness and become an asset in society. You can come back from a major mistake.

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Silent collusions, groupthink and unbridled power

The word ‘collusion’ has its roots in Latin. The Latin prefix col-, meaning “together,” and the verb ludere, “to play,” come together to form collude. The related noun collude has the specific meaning “secret agreement or cooperation.” (Mirriam Webster dictionary). The Collins dictionary defines collusion as “to act together through a secret understanding, esp. with evil or harmful intent”.

On the face of it, it seems clear that there would need to be a conversation of sorts to reach an agreement to cooperate. The question that is plaguing me however is whether the need for a verbal conversation or written agreement is necessary to enter a collusion. Could you have two or more players playing together without any meeting, secret or not, and without a verbal or written agreement to cooperate?

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